Lots of fun holiday ornaments in my glass shop right now! These make a fun little item to tie on your gifts, as well!

Lots of fun holiday ornaments in my glass shop right now! These make a fun little item to tie on your gifts, as well!

Learning more glass techniques - Part 2

I had the opportunity to attend a week long glass class with Gil Reynolds through Fusion Headquarters In Newberg, OR a couple of weeks ago and not only did I try a whole bunch of new things, but I came away with some great new glassy friends! 

Another technique I had not tried before was glass “combing.”  A project is built in the kiln and then fired to a hot enough temperature that the glass is “moveable” and a metal rod dragged through the glass will pull glass around or “comb” it. Using the color palette I had chosen for my projects that week I built a strip construction plate.  Here I am for the first pull of the glass  —- suited up with kevlar sleeves, gloves and dark glasses to protect me from the heat and light of the kiln that is nearly 1600 F.

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The glass is heated again after one pull because the cooling when the kiln door is opened will stiffen up the glass pretty quickly.  Here is my second pull….

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I did three pulls in the glass so here is the view of my plate on the third one.

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And here is the end result of my week.  My combed plate is on the upper right.  I am thrilled with all of these new possibilities!  Many thanks to Gil and my classmates for all the fun and inspiration!

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More use of Design Seeds palettes for color inspiration! I have more of these colors listed in my Etsy shop, as well!

More use of Design Seeds palettes for color inspiration! I have more of these colors listed in my Etsy shop, as well!

More new ideas from my recent glass class with Gil Reynolds!  And this little beauty is on reclaimed window glass!

Learning more glass techniques

I had the opportunity to attend a week long glass class with Gil Reynolds through Fusion Headquarters In Newberg, OR a couple of weeks ago and not only did I try a whole bunch of new things, but I came away with some great new glassy friends! 

One of the techniques I had not tried before was pulling vitrograph.  It involves an overhead kiln that has a hole in the bottom where the glass is pulled and shaped.  We can just say that I don’t have a “natural gift” for it, but it was fun and I ended up with some very cool shapes I can use in future projects.

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We also made a couple of different types of pattern bars…one over stainless steel bars and one a flow through a trough. I have made pattern bars previously but never ones with these flow patterns!!  Here is the set up (my section is the second from the top in both types).

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Here are the bars we made before we cut them apart.

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Then a little quality time with the wet saw…

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And here are end the end results for mine.  These are my bars than were dropped over the stainless steel rods….

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And my flow bars….

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Lots more cool techniques —- but more on that next post!

My dahlias still think it is summer….I don’t plan to tell them any different! These colors inspire my work all through the year…..

Playing with some new “wave” action and my glass “puddles!”

Evolution of a crackle bowl….

I love using the techniques I have learned lately to come up with my own unique glass.  Here is another crackle piece that ended up as a beautiful 10” bowl! 

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This is the interim state along with the Design Seeds color palette that inspired it! image

I started with a gradation of colors in powdered frit —-

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You can see that my “leveling” process over the frit resulted in some red getting dragged through the green…..not my first designs but I kind of like it, actually!  Here it is after it was fired once.

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Once it was capped with clear and fired again…

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I decided to layer this over more light peach cream in a larger size to give it a pronounced rim.

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I ended up with a couple of funky long bubbles that I drilled through with my dremel tool and refired with clear powder on top. Worked like a charm!  Then back into the kiln for a slump cycle in a deep bowl mold that has a nice rim on it……voila!

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