My dahlias still think it is summer….I don’t plan to tell them any different! These colors inspire my work all through the year…..

Playing with some new “wave” action and my glass “puddles!”

Evolution of a crackle bowl….

I love using the techniques I have learned lately to come up with my own unique glass.  Here is another crackle piece that ended up as a beautiful 10” bowl! 

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This is the interim state along with the Design Seeds color palette that inspired it! image

I started with a gradation of colors in powdered frit —-

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You can see that my “leveling” process over the frit resulted in some red getting dragged through the green…..not my first designs but I kind of like it, actually!  Here it is after it was fired once.

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Once it was capped with clear and fired again…

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I decided to layer this over more light peach cream in a larger size to give it a pronounced rim.

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I ended up with a couple of funky long bubbles that I drilled through with my dremel tool and refired with clear powder on top. Worked like a charm!  Then back into the kiln for a slump cycle in a deep bowl mold that has a nice rim on it……voila!

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Lots of beautiful one of a kind fused glass pendants available in my shop right now! Lots of fun for $20-$30 and they make great gifts!

Lots of beautiful one of a kind fused glass pendants available in my shop right now! Lots of fun for $20-$30 and they make great gifts!

Back to more “crackle” glass

I stocked up on glass powder after the big sales in July at both Bullseye and Uroboros Glass here in Portland so I was ready to get back to the crackle techniques I had learned in class this past Spring.  I was drooling through all the beautiful Design Seeds palettes that I had been saving and found a few to play with.  How about a step by step walk through of how this piece came to be?

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I started with this lovely combination as my inspiration…

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The base was made with glass powders in light aqua and turquoise transparent shades and then, using a flower stencil, I sifted two caribbean blue and one dark aquamarine flowers on top of the aqua and turquoise base.  Before the first firing it looked like this going into the kiln.

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Here is what it looked like after the first fire….

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I added an opaque oasis green in all the cracks you see here…..

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and then fired a second time with a cap of clear glass to get this….

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But what to do next? I wanted to bring in more green so I decided to use spring green opaque as the background glass.

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…..and what a difference that made!

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Lastly, it was slumped into a dish mold to get the final shape seen in the first photo….Next time I try these colors I will try a transparent background glass instead of opaque to keep more of the true color palette!

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So glad I have more colors to play with!

All done now!  More here - BPR Designs

Playing with more flowers and shrubs and fossil vitra — this is a small lacecap hygrangea and black glass as a test tile….I think my next version will be on a lighter color so I can bring out more of the flower colors but this one holds much promise!!

Playing with more flowers and shrubs and fossil vitra — this is a small lacecap hygrangea and black glass as a test tile….I think my next version will be on a lighter color so I can bring out more of the flower colors but this one holds much promise!!

Fossil Vitra continued….

So I promised more on my lavender “fossil vitra,” and here it is!  Just a reminder on where I got the info on this technique — check out Paul Tarlow’s site - Fusedglass.org for a detailed breakdown of the steps.

So here is the first bunch of lavender before I fired it under yummy creamy french vanilla glass….I used a combination of purple and blue on the flower heads here.image

And here is how it turned out after one firing.  image

Not bad, but I was a bit underwhelmed by it. So I thought, maybe I should add more lavender and some different color.  Then a PDX heat wave and some custom orders interrupted my process and by the time I got to round two with this piece, my lavender was getting a little past its prime. But I decided to give it a go anyway.  Here is the result using plum and purple on the flower heads and I used a lighter green on the stems. 

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You can see the change in the blooming stage of the flower heads between the two firings.  And the stems are a bit hard to read in some places.

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Just one more trip back to the kiln with a dusting of clear powdered frit on the top to add some shine and we’re nearly done.

Here is a second piece I did using a larger, fresher lavender species and purple powder with a dusty lilac sheet glass.  This one will also get a little “topcoat” to smooth the rough spots and give it shine and then I will decide what shape they will end up!

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I am always learning more with these techniques!  I think that is one of the things that intrigues me about kiln formed glass. Have a great weekend…..